Question

January 19, 2013 at 10:17 am | Posted in 1, Animals, Mind, People, Sight, Society | 6 Comments
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,
P1020511 Plane Truth Small

When conversing, keep your feet on the ground.

In certain conditions, your (usually unloved) penchant for penetrating questions may find favour in the world.

For instance, if you land in a regional airport and are confronted by a sniffer dog, there’s a good chance your fellow travellers will hurry past its handler.

You, of course, will be entranced by the beast.

If its handler feels bored, jaded, undervalued or just plain lonely amid careless crowds, you might just make her day.

Start small, by asking what her dog is trained to detect.

Then ask how long training takes.

Express amazement that the pooch can master so much in just 10-12 weeks.

Bookend your interview by asking (roughly) how long the dog’s career will last.

Then ask if, after a decade or so, the handler will have the option to keep the dog.

Observe her interaction with the animal.

If she loves it, even you should be able to perceive this.

The dog, unused to his handler receiving such attention, will fix you with a stare that penetrates far better than the X-ray machine behind you.

This is OK, because you have nothing to hide.

And, unlike humans, dogs and horses have no agenda.

So, for once, you can enjoy staring right back.

And then it’s time to leave.

Under NO circumstances should you go on to ask questions like:

  • When do you think your dog will die?
  • How will you feel when your dog dies?
  • How long will it take you to grieve?
  • Will you get another dog?
  • Will it feel the same?
  • What if it doesn’t?

While you may find these questions perfectly reasonable, most ‘normal’ people will NOT.

By breaking off an interview – even when you’re having fun – you stop it going bad.

Easier said than done, perhaps; but you can learn that less really is

more.

:)

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6 Comments »

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  1. Great thoughts Paul and the only problem i find is that people with dogs on official business rarely like you chatting about them so, as you point out, you’ve gotta pick the right dog handler… bored, jaded, undervalued or just plain lonely amid careless crowds

    • Thank you, Winston. As always, I greatly appreciate your patronage. You raise a funny point. Theoretically, aspies are the least able to ‘pick’ people. Yet sometimes, our obsession with detail can throw up the odd win. In light of your comment, I realise I actually ‘read’ this situation – something I’m usually very poor at doing. With kind regards and many thanks for your valuable insight, P. :)

  2. Lovely observations, as usual LWAS. Maybe you made her day? And the dog’s day/afternoon, of course. :-) I see what you mean about quitting while ahead though.

    • Thank you flying with us, Ad. We hope you had a pleasant trip! :)

  3. Nice site. I recently at 30 found out I have Aspergers. I just “followed” your site, feel free to check mine out! http://laughatmypain.wordpress.com/

    • Thanks very much, LAMP! I checked your site and it looks like you have a lot to say. Best of luck with getting it down. I hope the process does you as much good as it has me. Kind regards, P. :)


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