Finger bun

September 4, 2017 at 9:05 am | Posted in 1, Compulsions, Humour, Sight | 2 Comments
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Cl06fNWVAAAKvYE.jpg large

 

The proprietress has made a stout effort,

 

but several items appear recalcitrant.

 

Pic by Warren Kirk.

Save

Advertisements

Leaf

June 15, 2015 at 12:46 pm | Posted in Diagnosis, Family, Mind, Nature, Senses, Sight, Touch | 6 Comments
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Touch one, touch all.

At age three, you or your child may be told to put 50 fallen liquidambar leaves in a bucket.

Sounds fair: kids should help around the home.

50 ain’t many.

It’s a fine day.

Parents are near.

So why the crying?

The liquidambar leaf shape is relatively complex.

Worse, it can take infinite autumnal hues.

To an aspie toddler, a sole leaf may look challenging enough.

Mixed with other leaves, it becomes even more complicated – with endless permutations.

Focused on one leaf, the other 49 seem legion; the work highly daunting.

With more leaves falling on already cleared ground, the task appears impossible.

Too many simultaneous data overload the brain – triggering stress and threatening shutdown.

Mother can’t fathom the problem.

Nor can father, who becomes irate.

Yet the ‘brat’ before him isn’t ‘spoilt’, ‘stupid’, ‘disobedient’, ‘wilful’ or ‘lazy’.

Merely showing an early sign of what may take decades to identify and address.

It’s therefore advisable to try the ‘teaspoon test‘ before things turn ugly.

Doing so will likely save all parties time,

effort and

tears.

Brought to you by The Feisty Empire.

Pic by The Marmot.


If you found this post useful or entertaining, you may wish to:

Your smallest kindness will keep me going strong. With many thanks, Paul.


Save

Imagine

March 25, 2015 at 2:31 pm | Posted in Benefits, Interests, Mind, Recreation, Senses, Sight, Treatment | 4 Comments
Tags: , , , , , , ,
A very, very exciting day!

A very, very exciting day!

Do you wonder what aspie fiction is like?

This collection of 19 short stories may give you an idea.

There's your book; now ... buy it!

There’s your book; now … buy it!

It took 20 years to create.

That should make it 200% better than Catch 22.

You can determine if this is true by buying Imagine Day.

To do so, go here or email paul@thefeistyempire.com to request a personalised message.

This first edition, strictly limited to just 200 copies, will be the only one featuring dedications written with my Magic Red Pen.

Regular readers of this blog will know I don’t flog stuff.

So this book must be rather special.

How frightfully exciting!

🙂

Brought to you by The Feisty Empire.

Question

January 19, 2013 at 10:17 am | Posted in 1, Animals, Mind, People, Sight, Society | 6 Comments
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,
P1020511 Plane Truth Small

When conversing, keep your feet on the ground.

In certain conditions, your (usually unloved) penchant for penetrating questions may find favour in the world.

For instance, if you land in a regional airport and are confronted by a sniffer dog, there’s a good chance your fellow travellers will hurry past its handler.

You, of course, will be entranced by the beast.

If its handler feels bored, jaded, undervalued or just plain lonely amid careless crowds, you might just make her day.

Start small, by asking what her dog is trained to detect.

Then ask how long training takes.

Express amazement that the pooch can master so much in just 10-12 weeks.

Bookend your interview by asking (roughly) how long the dog’s career will last.

Then ask if, after a decade or so, the handler will have the option to keep the dog.

Observe her interaction with the animal.

If she loves it, even you should be able to perceive this.

The dog, unused to his handler receiving such attention, will fix you with a stare that penetrates far better than the X-ray machine behind you.

This is OK, because you have nothing to hide.

And, unlike humans, dogs and horses have no agenda.

So, for once, you can enjoy staring right back.

And then it’s time to leave.

Under NO circumstances should you go on to ask questions like:

  • When do you think your dog will die?
  • How will you feel when your dog dies?
  • How long will it take you to grieve?
  • Will you get another dog?
  • Will it feel the same?
  • What if it doesn’t?

While you may find these questions perfectly reasonable, most ‘normal’ people will NOT.

By breaking off an interview – even when you’re having fun – you stop it going bad.

Easier said than done, perhaps; but you can learn that less really is

more.

🙂

Brought to you by The Feisty Empire.

Seat

December 7, 2012 at 3:00 pm | Posted in 1, Compulsions, Humour, Mind, People, Sight, Society, Threats | 10 Comments
Tags: , , , , ,
Chairs Small

NOT as easy as it seems.

Few would comprehend (or believe) the lightning thinking that precedes your choice of chair.

You enter a waiting room (itself a feat).

First priority is safety.

Check the corners. Does one offer a view of the entrance through which your appointment will appear?

If so, can you also see outside (to avoid eye contact, pass the time and spot long-range threats)?

Corners mean you need monitor only 90 degrees for danger.

Walls, therefore, run a very poor second.

The centre, naturally, is right out.

But position isn’t everything.

Check the seating. Is it solo?

If it’s a two-seater couch, you may be able to thwart later arrivals with your bag and coat. (This also applies to pairs of chairs.)

If it’s a three-seater (or more) you may have unwelcome company.

What sort of couch is it?

If it’s too soft, slippery and/or deep, you may have trouble rising quickly to meet any threat.

Better a firm, high one with good back support.

But even the ideal chair in the perfect corner can come unstuck.

Is it near a radio speaker (perhaps blaring a chaotic commercial station)? The cacophony will erode your (frail) composure.

Is it next to a water cooler, rubbish bin, pamphlet stand, children’s play area or stack of filthy, outdated magazines?

If so, people (at worst, infants) may launch themselves at you from all quarters without warning.

Waiting rooms are so hideous, it’s best to be the first appointment of the day.

Though this carries its own peril if your appointment still contrives to be late.

The silver line to this stormy cloud concerns your partner.

If, after some time together, your covivant can scan a space with 80 chairs and point to the exact one you’d pick,

you’ll know it’s true love.

Marry them without delay.

🙂

Brought to you by The Feisty Empire.

Coin

October 2, 2012 at 9:17 am | Posted in Compulsions, Senses, Sight, Society, Touch | 2 Comments
Tags: , , , , , , , ,

This series starts so well, but then it turns to sh*t.

Depending on your country of residence, your confusion about currency may not be confined to banknotes.

This Australian sequence, for instance, is counterintuitive to say the least.

Fortunately, you’ll likely get your mind around it after a few months.

This is good, as you have little choice in such matters of State.

Confronted with absolutes, it’s better to go with the flow than rail to zero effect.

😐

Brought to you by The Feisty Empire.

Little

April 8, 2012 at 9:22 am | Posted in Benefits, Interests, Recreation, Senses, Sight | 5 Comments
Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Little things mean a lot!

Though being highly detail oriented can be a total pain in the bum, it also brings advantages.

One benefit is that you spot things others never see.

I bet if you discovered this tiny Number 5, there wouldn’t be another soul within 20 km who knew about it.

Perhaps only the person who designed the nut and maybe – just maybe – the person who installed it.

It’s a little thing, for sure.

But if you start small, your universe expands out of sight.

🙂

Brought to you by The Feisty Empire.

Number

April 6, 2012 at 10:02 am | Posted in Benefits, Compulsions, Interests, Recreation, Senses, Sight | 1 Comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Count yourself lucky!

If you’re entranced by numbers, you can take your passion beyond the screen and into the wider world.

Hunting numbers gives purpose and excitement to your journeys – turning them into mini safaris.

Carrying a camera gives you something to do – and an ‘excuse’ to be where you are.

It’s fun. It keeps you fit. Kind viewers give you helpful feedback (and thus validation).

And if you’re any good (which will likely be the case) you can sell your photos to stock shot firms.

I’m experimenting with three types of photo number blog here and here.

Which do you prefer?

🙂

Brought to you by The Feisty Empire.

Colouring-in

May 1, 2010 at 1:24 pm | Posted in 1, Compulsions, Family, Interests, Mind, Recreation, Senses, Sight, Touch | 5 Comments
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Points of difference.

You don’t see so many kids’ colouring-in books these days.

If you’re old enough, though, you may recall the pleasure of completing them.

Not all books were the same.

The designs, for instance, varied wildly – from obsessively intricate to insultingly facile.

The best fell somewhere in between.

The papers varied too. From shiny surfaces that barely took a pencil mark to blotter-style offerings that soaked each careful texta stroke far beyond its intended position.

It was rare, therefore, to get a pleasing design on practical paper.

Christmas ‘Bumper Fun Books’, by dint of their sheer size, usually carried two or three satisfying options.

With your attention to detail so keen, you naturally coloured within the lines.

Yet sometimes, engrossed in activity, an unguarded movement saw your marker slip.

This transgression marred the entire work. So much that you had to employ your black texta (the most valuable in the set, and the one most likely to fail first through overuse).

You traced the entire colouring-in design with black, making all the lines slightly wider.

At the slip-up, the line became wider still, as you covered the alien colour with pitch.

The result was not unlike a stained-glass window.

Alas, some errors were too big to mask and had to remain patent.

When you submitted a work thus flawed to your parent, their judgment was revealing.

Instead of praising your industry, your palette or your almost-perfect execution, they did something else.

They started at ten, then subtracted one mark for each crossed line.

Never, in your entire childhood, did you score a perfect ten.

Though you tried and tried and tried.

It was only 40 years later, when writing a blog post to ameliorate the Great Sadness that had befallen you on waking, that you realised something.

Your parent had Asperger’s too.

😐

Brought to you by The Feisty Empire.

Patina

February 10, 2010 at 5:46 pm | Posted in Benefits, Interests, Mind, Nature, People, Recreation, Senses, Sight, Touch | 4 Comments
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Read the runes (of ruin).

Read the runes (of ruin).

‘Patina of age’.

Once you encounter this phrase, you’ll likely use it often.

For it describes something quite fascinating.

‘Patina’ began as a greenish film on old bronze.

It expanded to include an oxide coating on any metal surface.

Now it resides on 343,000* web pages of every hue.

Wood, masonry, plaster, paint … the works.

Images like those above and below may interest you more than most television programs.

Studying objects with a patina of age, you’ll trace eras, incidents and processes (human-related and otherwise).

These photos depict but a fragment of an old building, the exploration of which could occupy many happy hours.

If you ever renovate an old, old house, you’ll get great pleasure from:

  1. peeling back the decades;
  2. unearthing artifacts; and
  3. imagining the lost lives of others.

Passing motorists were doubtless amused as I laboured to perfect this close-up.

* At time of writing.

Brought to you by The Feisty Empire.

Next Page »


Entries and comments feeds.