Leaf

June 15, 2015 at 12:46 pm | Posted in Diagnosis, Family, Mind, Nature, Senses, Sight, Touch | 6 Comments
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Touch one, touch all.

At age three, you or your child may be told to put 50 fallen liquidambar leaves in a bucket.

Sounds fair: kids should help around the home.

50 ain’t many.

It’s a fine day.

Parents are near.

So why the crying?

The liquidambar leaf shape is relatively complex.

Worse, it can take infinite autumnal hues.

To an aspie toddler, a sole leaf may look challenging enough.

Mixed with other leaves, it becomes even more complicated – with endless permutations.

Focused on one leaf, the other 49 seem legion; the work highly daunting.

With more leaves falling on already cleared ground, the task appears impossible.

Too many simultaneous data overload the brain – triggering stress and threatening shutdown.

Mother can’t fathom the problem.

Nor can father, who becomes irate.

Yet the ‘brat’ before him isn’t ‘spoilt’, ‘stupid’, ‘disobedient’, ‘wilful’ or ‘lazy’.

Merely showing an early sign of what may take decades to identify and address.

It’s therefore advisable to try the ‘teaspoon test‘ before things turn ugly.

Doing so will likely save all parties time,

effort and

tears.

Brought to you by The Feisty Empire.

Pic by The Marmot.


If you found this post useful or entertaining, you may wish to:

Your smallest kindness will keep me going strong. With many thanks, Paul.


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Transference

March 5, 2014 at 8:55 am | Posted in Animals, Family, Mind | 4 Comments
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The puppy as a child.

The puppy as a child.

If childless, you should have more success than most deriving faux-parenting experiences from non-infants.

This will likely be due to your vivid imagination and strong ability to anthropomorphize.

The flip side of ‘making do’ with substitute offspring is that when your pet does die, your heart will shatter with grief.

Yet it’ll probably be worth it.


If you found this content useful or entertaining, you may wish to:

Even a buck or three will keep me in the hunt. With many thanks, Paul.


Question

January 19, 2013 at 10:17 am | Posted in 1, Animals, Mind, People, Sight, Society | 6 Comments
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P1020511 Plane Truth Small

When conversing, keep your feet on the ground.

In certain conditions, your (usually unloved) penchant for penetrating questions may find favour in the world.

For instance, if you land in a regional airport and are confronted by a sniffer dog, there’s a good chance your fellow travellers will hurry past its handler.

You, of course, will be entranced by the beast.

If its handler feels bored, jaded, undervalued or just plain lonely amid careless crowds, you might just make her day.

Start small, by asking what her dog is trained to detect.

Then ask how long training takes.

Express amazement that the pooch can master so much in just 10-12 weeks.

Bookend your interview by asking (roughly) how long the dog’s career will last.

Then ask if, after a decade or so, the handler will have the option to keep the dog.

Observe her interaction with the animal.

If she loves it, even you should be able to perceive this.

The dog, unused to his handler receiving such attention, will fix you with a stare that penetrates far better than the X-ray machine behind you.

This is OK, because you have nothing to hide.

And, unlike humans, dogs and horses have no agenda.

So, for once, you can enjoy staring right back.

And then it’s time to leave.

Under NO circumstances should you go on to ask questions like:

  • When do you think your dog will die?
  • How will you feel when your dog dies?
  • How long will it take you to grieve?
  • Will you get another dog?
  • Will it feel the same?
  • What if it doesn’t?

While you may find these questions perfectly reasonable, most ‘normal’ people will NOT.

By breaking off an interview – even when you’re having fun – you stop it going bad.

Easier said than done, perhaps; but you can learn that less really is

more.

🙂

Brought to you by The Feisty Empire.

Earth

December 6, 2012 at 8:52 am | Posted in Body, Mind, Nature, Recreation, Senses, Touch, Treatment | 6 Comments
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Splendour in the Grass Small

Step into your (new) comfort zone!

Chances are you live in your head far more than your body.

While a rich mental life offers entertaining discourse with superior company, you can have too much of a good thing.

At the most practical level, your body is a life-support system for your brain.

Serving the latter to the detriment of the former ultimately compromises both.

So, while hobbies, alcohol, medication and literature may seem preferred paths to contentment, beware false readings from a selfish organ that knows exactly what you’re thinking.

Though all impulses may screech to the contrary, it’s vital to shift your corporeal form.

The trick is to find a (probably solo) exercise you enjoy.

Swimming is ideal, but unsuited to warmer months.

Walking is a good year-round alternative.

If you can find a large grassed oval that’s deserted at inconvenient times, you’re in for a treat.

At first, the prospect of circling with nothing but your protesting mind may daunt.

To ease yourself in, try downloading fascinating documentaries to an iPod or some such.

Acquiring facts is a great way to silence your inner voice.

Once you’re in the swing, take the next step.

Take off your runners and walk barefoot.

At once, the 2D green disc you’ve been traipsing will become a 3D sensory adventure.

Suddenly, you’ll detect every nuance of the turf.

After rain, you’ll feel the little mounds worms made overnight.

When the sprinklers are on, you’ll slosh through puddles and streams.

When it’s dry, you’ll scale tiny sand dunes.

Soon you’ll realise the oval has a camber to aid drainage.

And that a barely perceptible tilt creates a particularly lush spot.

Each time you pass through this, the grass will remind you that, while still an etherial being, you’re definitely of this Earth.

Literally and metaphorically rooting yourself in the real world is an ideal counter to a busy brain.

And the fitness you gain will keep the relationship healthy.

If you’re lucky enough to live by the sea, the benefits of walking barefoot increase a thousandfold.

So close that book, put down that bottle, turn off that screen and

GO!

🙂

Brought to you by The Feisty Empire.

Patina

February 10, 2010 at 5:46 pm | Posted in Benefits, Interests, Mind, Nature, People, Recreation, Senses, Sight, Touch | 4 Comments
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Read the runes (of ruin).

Read the runes (of ruin).

‘Patina of age’.

Once you encounter this phrase, you’ll likely use it often.

For it describes something quite fascinating.

‘Patina’ began as a greenish film on old bronze.

It expanded to include an oxide coating on any metal surface.

Now it resides on 343,000* web pages of every hue.

Wood, masonry, plaster, paint … the works.

Images like those above and below may interest you more than most television programs.

Studying objects with a patina of age, you’ll trace eras, incidents and processes (human-related and otherwise).

These photos depict but a fragment of an old building, the exploration of which could occupy many happy hours.

If you ever renovate an old, old house, you’ll get great pleasure from:

  1. peeling back the decades;
  2. unearthing artifacts; and
  3. imagining the lost lives of others.

Passing motorists were doubtless amused as I laboured to perfect this close-up.

* At time of writing.

Brought to you by The Feisty Empire.

New

February 6, 2010 at 8:53 am | Posted in Animals, Benefits, Interests, Nature, Senses, Sight | Leave a comment
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100% potential. A clean slate. Nothing wrong.

Life is messy, complicated and riddled with painful errors (and fear thereof).

You may therefore feel drawn to ‘new’ things.

Scenes and objects uncorrupted and yet to fail.

Seedlings. Sunrises. New books. Untrodden beaches. Freshly painted rooms. Unmade plastic models.

That sort of thing.

Nature, of course, is always renewing.

Observing the split of a daffodil bud.

Or the moment a puppy first opens her eyes.

Will very likely thrill you to the core.

So turn off the TV.

Leave your room.

And get amongst it!

While others hurry past, you stand in awe as the cosmos displays in microcosm.

Possum

January 15, 2010 at 2:42 pm | Posted in Animals, Benefits, Nature, People, Senses, Sight | 1 Comment
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Can you see the fresh green scratch?

It’s nice to watch possums scrabble among eucalypts at night.

By day, it’s satisfying to trace the oh-so-faint ‘paths’ their furry bodies smooth onto the bark.

Closer up, it’s even more satisfying to detect claw marks.

Best of all is to spot the one tiny mark that’s green.

For that mark was made just last night.

By a possum that’s probably watching you right now.

And only you and a very few others have the power to notice such things. 🙂

Sign

January 10, 2010 at 6:16 pm | Posted in Compulsions, Humour, Interests, Mind, Nature, People, Sight | 5 Comments
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Could you resist such a well-presented data source?

When you stroll in a well-run park, you may take longer than others.

This is because you like to read the signs.

Signs give information. Correctly used, information is a source of power.

With few other power sources at your disposal, you’ll naturally want to maximise the ones you have.

As you devour every word, your companion/s may either wait and fret by your side or walk on without you.

That’s fine. Just thank them for their ‘patience’ and remind them how good you feel when you learn something new.

That usually shuts them up quick smart! 🙂

Didn’t think so!

Dogfood

January 7, 2010 at 7:35 pm | Posted in 1, Animals, Compulsions, Mind, Sight | 2 Comments
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This brand is easy.
Others are much, much harder to calculate.

If you have two dogs of the same breed, you may feel irresistibly compelled to feed them identically.

And I mean identically.

This isn’t so hard with the type of dog food pictured above.

But God help you if your partner buys granular dogfood – and you either have to count the tiny fragments or weigh the bowls.

The dogs don’t give a damn about these taxing mental machinations.

Nor should you.

But sometimes, that’s the way the cookie crumbles.

🙂

Brought to you by The Feisty Empire.

Animism

December 14, 2009 at 9:18 am | Posted in Mind, Nature, People, Sight, Society | 15 Comments
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Is the ivy malicious? Is the tree afraid?

Consider the photo above. Does it look to you as if the ivy has mounted a full-scale assault on this tree?

I was stopped in my tracks by this gripping scene. Immediately my mind began anthropomorphizing the ‘combatants’.

The ivy was evil. The tree was terrified. It was like the old eagle/snake taxidermy cliché – played out in vegetation.

See the tendrils following the channels in the bark?
Is this not evidence of intent?

Closer inspection confirmed my view that the ivy knew exactly what it was doing. And meant business.

Yet how could an Aspie, hopeless at discerning even the most obvious social signals from humans, pretend to know the mind and will of a creeper?

Is it because I’m socially dysfunctional that I ‘lower my sights’ to relate with simpler organisms? Or is this just an overheated imagination gone crazy?

Here’s how the tree sees it:

Scary? No?

But trees can’t ‘see’, can they? And creepers aren’t really evil, are they?

Are we absolutely sure?

This scares the crap out of me.
Imagine how the tree feels!

From trees to flies to spiders to weeds. I invest every living thing I see with a soul and a mind.

Even cars, fridges and VCRs have given me pause for thought over the years.

What I’d really like to know is whether this is an Asperger thing or something else.

To this end, I warmly welcome your frank comments.

🙂

Brought to you by The Feisty Empire.

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