Gym

May 24, 2015 at 8:23 am | Posted in Body, School, Touch, Treatment | 4 Comments
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Much more fun than it looks.

Poor coordination, low self esteem, lack of team spirit and/or a preference for academic pursuits may make school gymnasium time dispiriting and uncomfortable.

There may be one activity, however, that you do enjoy.

If the gym has large, thick, heavy exercise (tumble) mats, your class may play the unofficial (and sometimes banned) game of ‘stacks on the mill‘ – or whatever it’s called in your world.

Basically, a few students lie on the first mat, while the other mats are piled on top.

The students outside the pile then jump on top of it and bounce up and down – theoretically trying to crush their colleagues to death, but in the knowledge that the ‘give’ in the first mat makes this (unfortunately) impossible.

You may find you much prefer to be a ‘crushee’, rather than a crusher.

In fact, you may well be able to withstand more weight, and for longer, than any other child.

This may result in you ending up alone beneath all but one of the mats, and all but one of your class.

To enhance your splendid isolation, you may even wriggle to the centre of the pile while chaos reigns above.

There you can relax in warm, dark, comfortable solitude.

Until the gym teacher comes along to ruin the only good thing about your physical education class.

Decades later, you may learn that Temple Grandin recognised the value of non-human ‘hugs’ and actually created a ‘hug machine‘ (or hug box) to this effect.

While you may not feel the need to install one of these in your lounge room, it will be satisfying to realise why you loved to be last on the first mat all those years ago.

Brought to you by The Feisty Empire.

 

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Commission

April 13, 2015 at 9:50 am | Posted in Treatment | 4 Comments
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Bring out the biggest gun.

If you’re young, your otherness may make you an easy target for paedophiles.

If you’re unlucky enough to fall victim, the road to recovery may be twisted and long.

Medication, alcohol, therapy, creative writing – all may fail to heal (or even mask) your pain.

That’s where a Royal Commission comes in handy.

Vast, inexorable and insanely powerful, mere mention of this crushing juggernaut turns kiddy fiddler blood to ice.

Once you give evidence to an actual commissioner, your case is referred to a nice policeman who turns every stone to bring your attacker to justice.

The process is exhaustive and exhausting.

Black leaves from your lake bed cloud your days anew.

But it’s not as bad as living with trauma unabated.

And one fine day, acknowledgement, apology and even reparation may be yours.


 

Brought to you by The Feisty Empire.

Imagine

March 25, 2015 at 2:31 pm | Posted in Benefits, Interests, Mind, Recreation, Senses, Sight, Treatment | 4 Comments
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A very, very exciting day!

A very, very exciting day!

Do you wonder what aspie fiction is like?

This collection of 19 short stories may give you an idea.

There's your book; now ... buy it!

There’s your book; now … buy it!

It took 20 years to create.

That should make it 200% better than Catch 22.

You can determine if this is true by buying Imagine Day.

To do so, go here or email paul@thefeistyempire.com to request a personalised message.

This first edition, strictly limited to just 200 copies, will be the only one featuring dedications written with my Magic Red Pen.

Regular readers of this blog will know I don’t flog stuff.

So this book must be rather special.

How frightfully exciting!

🙂

Brought to you by The Feisty Empire.

Diesel

May 26, 2014 at 7:11 am | Posted in Benefits, Hearing, Senses, Treatment | Leave a comment
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71 Med

Behold your superpower!

Next time you’re having a bad day, keep an eye out for Mercedes cars.

From up to 50 metres away, your keen hearing will come to the fore.

As you approach each car from the front, you’ll discern by the engine’s more guttural timbre whether it’s diesel-powered.

As you pass the car, you’ll know beyond doubt that it’s rear end will sport a D or DIESEL in raised, chrome-plated letters.

When you see this sign of your small superpower, you’ll feel a bit better.

Not much better, but anything is better on a bad day.

Brought to you by The Feisty Empire.

 

Autobiography

December 29, 2013 at 7:20 am | Posted in 1, Interests, Treatment | 2 Comments
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An introduction to Paul Hassing's autobiography

Take the plunge!

If you’ve enjoyed this blog, you may also like my newest project.

It’s an autobiography, whose style you’ll find familiar.

I warmly welcome your visit and comments.

🙂

Brought to you by The Feisty Empire.

Biplane

April 10, 2013 at 5:32 am | Posted in 1, Benefits, Family, Recreation, Senses, Treatment | 4 Comments
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Biplane start

Unforgettable.

A fabulous gift for an aspie is a biplane flight.

Strapped snugly in the cockpit, with the pilot behind, you see the airstrip beckon.

When the engine fires, you feel every rod and tappet clanking away.

Takeoff is breathtakingly swift.

Once you’re aloft, the strut wires zing as the tiny craft surfs every zephyr.

But you don’t feel afraid.

The plane is over 90 years old. Statistically, if it were going to crash, it would’ve done so already.

Though linked to the pilot by headphones, the wind and noise dissuade chit-chat – freeing you to savour the journey alone.

As you gaze down at your past – mapped out in homes, schools, offices and parks – you may feel brief respite from life’s struggle.

And on your reluctant return to earth, you’ll very likely feel blessed that someone cared enough to grant you such a wonderful adventure.

🙂

Brought to you by The Feisty Empire.

Xmas

December 26, 2012 at 7:23 am | Posted in Family, People, Society, Treatment | 9 Comments
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Graham Christmas Small

A time to take special care of yourself.

Xmas (Christmas) can be very tricky.

If you have no (or another) religion,

or can’t/don’t/won’t have kids,

or don’t believe in Santa,

or don’t like socialising,

or don’t wish to clutter your home with needless purchases,

there are few (if any) reasons to celebrate.

You may therefore feel your otherness particularly keenly at this time.

If you have a non-aspie partner, this will likely hit them pretty hard.

So it’s important to take extra care of yourselves and each other.

This may involve bolting the door and bunkering down until it’s all over.

A more positive use of ‘downtime’ is to go where others aren’t (e.g. a golf course at dawn on xmas morning).

If you have pets, make the most of them.

For they accept you, even if you are a ‘freak‘.

😐

Brought to you by The Feisty Empire.

Earth

December 6, 2012 at 8:52 am | Posted in Body, Mind, Nature, Recreation, Senses, Touch, Treatment | 6 Comments
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Splendour in the Grass Small

Step into your (new) comfort zone!

Chances are you live in your head far more than your body.

While a rich mental life offers entertaining discourse with superior company, you can have too much of a good thing.

At the most practical level, your body is a life-support system for your brain.

Serving the latter to the detriment of the former ultimately compromises both.

So, while hobbies, alcohol, medication and literature may seem preferred paths to contentment, beware false readings from a selfish organ that knows exactly what you’re thinking.

Though all impulses may screech to the contrary, it’s vital to shift your corporeal form.

The trick is to find a (probably solo) exercise you enjoy.

Swimming is ideal, but unsuited to warmer months.

Walking is a good year-round alternative.

If you can find a large grassed oval that’s deserted at inconvenient times, you’re in for a treat.

At first, the prospect of circling with nothing but your protesting mind may daunt.

To ease yourself in, try downloading fascinating documentaries to an iPod or some such.

Acquiring facts is a great way to silence your inner voice.

Once you’re in the swing, take the next step.

Take off your runners and walk barefoot.

At once, the 2D green disc you’ve been traipsing will become a 3D sensory adventure.

Suddenly, you’ll detect every nuance of the turf.

After rain, you’ll feel the little mounds worms made overnight.

When the sprinklers are on, you’ll slosh through puddles and streams.

When it’s dry, you’ll scale tiny sand dunes.

Soon you’ll realise the oval has a camber to aid drainage.

And that a barely perceptible tilt creates a particularly lush spot.

Each time you pass through this, the grass will remind you that, while still an etherial being, you’re definitely of this Earth.

Literally and metaphorically rooting yourself in the real world is an ideal counter to a busy brain.

And the fitness you gain will keep the relationship healthy.

If you’re lucky enough to live by the sea, the benefits of walking barefoot increase a thousandfold.

So close that book, put down that bottle, turn off that screen and

GO!

🙂

Brought to you by The Feisty Empire.

HSP

October 8, 2012 at 7:32 am | Posted in Diagnosis, Treatment | 3 Comments
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Worth the trip.

If your counsellor  mentions ‘Highly Sensitive Person Syndrome‘, your first impulse may be to laugh.

First, it sounds like a pretty wishy-washy name.

Second, you already suffer from Asperger Syndrome; of what possible use could another condition be?

Still, as you’re always questing to find your way in a difficult world, you may accept your counsellor’s recommendation to read The Highly Sensitive Person by Elaine N. Aron.

If you do, you may be struck by three things:

  1. There’s a questionnaire to see just how sensitive you are. Chances are you’ll attain a perfect score.
  2. Elaine is obviously an HSP, and her empathy with your condition is very welcome.
  3. She offers some useful and practical life tips.

Chief among these are:

  • Be your own ‘parent’ (i.e. look after yourself as if you still had a living and/or caring mother or father).
  • If you’re about to freak out in a situation, give it just a bit more time. Promise yourself you can leave if things remain difficult. There’s a good chance that after you get over your initial panic, you’ll be OK.
  • You really can’t afford to hide in your room forever. Especially if you have a partner. Give new things a go now and then. If something is too hard, you can always withdraw. But at least make an effort.

While some parts of the book may be uncomfortable to read, it’s true that without some pain there’s little gain.

On balance, you should find that The Highly Sensitive Person will reward your time and effort.

The book costs about ten bucks and you can buy it here.

🙂

Brought to you by The Feisty Empire.

Converse

April 2, 2010 at 8:30 am | Posted in Family, Mind, People, Society, Threats, Treatment | 5 Comments
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Read my lips.

Conversation can be so very difficult.

It’s especially upsetting when you try to participate fully and in good faith, only to fail utterly and incur the wrath of the other party.

Let’s say your partner informs you that their sibling’s cat is missing.

You ask if the sibling is upset.

Your partner becomes annoyed. Of course the sibling is upset!

This perplexes you, because six months ago, you heard the sibling tied their pet dog to their toddler’s tricycle because they didn’t have time to exercise either.

From this, you deduced the sibling didn’t much care for the dog.

By extrapolation, you surmised they weren’t fond of the cat either.

Your question, therefore, is logical.

Logical, perhaps. But your error lies elsewhere.

You perceived your partner’s news as an invitation to dialogue.

To participate fully and in good faith in this dialogue, you asked a question.

In reality, however, your partner merely wanted you to make the noises appropriate to such news under normal circumstances.

This is akin to small talk.

The dog, toddler and tricycle, however pertinent to your situational view, were irrelevant to the discussion.

Thus your deeper interest, though it sprang from a genuine place, was neither necessary nor welcome.

Your partner’s rebuff stings twice, because you:

  1. Were trying hard to converse like a normal person.
  2. Felt you were doing pretty well to recall the discussion of six months ago.

Alas, no dice. It just isn’t that simple.

This is one of the downsides of aspergers.

Your counsellor may say casual conversation can be learned.

But it certainly seems small talk is a big ask.

😦

Brought to you by The Feisty Empire.

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