Autobiography

December 29, 2013 at 7:20 am | Posted in 1, Interests, Treatment | 2 Comments
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An introduction to Paul Hassing's autobiography

Take the plunge!

If you’ve enjoyed this blog, you may also like my newest project.

It’s an autobiography, whose style you’ll find familiar.

I warmly welcome your visit and comments.

🙂

Brought to you by The Feisty Empire.

Colouring-in

May 1, 2010 at 1:24 pm | Posted in 1, Compulsions, Family, Interests, Mind, Recreation, Senses, Sight, Touch | 5 Comments
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Points of difference.

You don’t see so many kids’ colouring-in books these days.

If you’re old enough, though, you may recall the pleasure of completing them.

Not all books were the same.

The designs, for instance, varied wildly – from obsessively intricate to insultingly facile.

The best fell somewhere in between.

The papers varied too. From shiny surfaces that barely took a pencil mark to blotter-style offerings that soaked each careful texta stroke far beyond its intended position.

It was rare, therefore, to get a pleasing design on practical paper.

Christmas ‘Bumper Fun Books’, by dint of their sheer size, usually carried two or three satisfying options.

With your attention to detail so keen, you naturally coloured within the lines.

Yet sometimes, engrossed in activity, an unguarded movement saw your marker slip.

This transgression marred the entire work. So much that you had to employ your black texta (the most valuable in the set, and the one most likely to fail first through overuse).

You traced the entire colouring-in design with black, making all the lines slightly wider.

At the slip-up, the line became wider still, as you covered the alien colour with pitch.

The result was not unlike a stained-glass window.

Alas, some errors were too big to mask and had to remain patent.

When you submitted a work thus flawed to your parent, their judgment was revealing.

Instead of praising your industry, your palette or your almost-perfect execution, they did something else.

They started at ten, then subtracted one mark for each crossed line.

Never, in your entire childhood, did you score a perfect ten.

Though you tried and tried and tried.

It was only 40 years later, when writing a blog post to ameliorate the Great Sadness that had befallen you on waking, that you realised something.

Your parent had Asperger’s too.

😐

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Frame

November 29, 2009 at 4:17 pm | Posted in Benefits, Compulsions, Interests, Recreation, Senses, Sight, Treatment | 5 Comments
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Once again, fine details are pronounced.

As discussed in Art and Detail, your compositions may be unusual for your age (or indeed any age).

Pieces like the one above may languish hidden in your home for decades.

Yet there’s power and satisfaction to be derived from rescuing your art, framing it nicely and displaying it with pride.

Chances are you’re going to be ‘odd’ for the rest of your life.

Why not revel in your special gifts and enjoy your time on earth?

🙂

Brought to you by The Feisty Empire.

Focus

October 26, 2009 at 3:58 pm | Posted in Compulsions, Humour, Interests, People, Senses, Sight, Threats, Treatment | 2 Comments
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Strike One.

Strike One.

Given your first camera, you may prefer to capture scenes, rather than people.

Later in life, it may disturb you to learn that Adolf Hitler did the same thing in his paintings.

Strike Two.

Strike Two.

As these photographs attest, your intense concentration on the subject may occur at the expense of all other stimuli.

This is because you’re a one-thing-at-a-time person.

Strike Three.

Strike Three.

Fortunately, digital cameras have obviated the frustration and expense of getting back disappointing photos like this.

🙂

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Art

June 17, 2009 at 7:06 pm | Posted in Benefits, Interests, Mind, School, Sight | Leave a comment
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Painting in 1973

Painting in 1973

When doing art at primary school with scissors, glue and coloured fabric scraps, you’ll probably create something extraordinary.

Not only will your subject be atypical for your age (e.g. an erupting volcano) you’ll also use the materials metaphorically (e.g. bold black strips to indicate flying lava trajectory).

The result will be so unusual that your teacher may discuss it with your parents.

Don’t get your hopes up.

Though your piece will stand out clearly from the families, pets and vehicles depicted by your classmates, it’ll fail to garner a red-and-yellow SOLD sticker in the art gallery at the school fete.

Instead, it’ll be taken down, folded double and returned to you as a memento of your ‘otherness’.

Whether you can parlay this trait into a viable artistic career is entirely up to you.

A Volcano. Circa 1970.

A Volcano. Circa 1970.

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